Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on March 15th, 2010 | by The Editor
Image © I write this having just spent the weekend in Birmingham at the Lib Dems’ very successful Spring Conference. We’ve had terrific media coverage over the last few days, and Nick Clegg’s speech on Sunday afternoon was fiery, passionate, and very well-received. The message that the Liberal Democrats are the only party who can provide the fair future most people want came through loud and clear, and will resonate well with the public. Whether it be our plan for fair taxes, giving most people a £700 tax cut, and taking everyone earning under £10,000 out of tax completely; our pledge to give children a fair start by investing an extra £2.5 billion in education, targeted at the most disadvantaged; our promise to create a rebalanced green economy, with emphasis on reviving our manufacturing industry, and splitting up the banks; or our vow to reshape our political system with fair votes, fair funding of parties, and the promise that constituents will have the power to sack corrupt MPs – it is the Liberal Democrats who have the most compelling message going into this election. My job now is to go out and sell that on the doorsteps in Wirral South. As ever, I’ve been across the length and breadth of the constituency over the past month, talking to a wide variety of groups and individuals. Three weeks ago, I had a bit of an “education day”,  with a visit to three schools in the constituency, talking with other young people about issues that matter to them, and what their future might hold. It is sad to say that the current outlook is bleak. One in five young people can’t get a job. That’s 6,000 people in my area of the Wirral, and one million across the entire country that are not in education, employment or training (NEETs as they are known), and this number is growing all the time. These are shocking statistics, and show how a generation of promising young people are being left behind. I count myself very fortunate to have got my current job when I did. It was in October 2008, just before the recession really started to bite. Opportunities since, in almost every sector, have become increasingly scarce. I have friends who graduated from university a year later than me, some with Masters Degrees, who have been left in limbo, unable to find work, and struggling to even get an unpaid internship. Even those of us who were lucky enough to get jobs are crippled by a mountain of student debt. And it’s a situation that increasingly worries a lot of the young people I meet. One of the three schools I visited was Wirral Grammar School for Girls. I spoke to a group of their sixth form students, who were a lively, engaged group, knowledgeable about a lot of topics and a credit to their school. There were the usual questions on hung parliaments, electoral systems, immigration, and “can the Lib Dems win?” (the answer’s yes by the way, if you were in any doubt!). But in amongst them, there were questions on cuts to university funding, debt and unemployment. Young people have become increasingly apprehensive about the future, worried about whether there’ll even be enough university places for them, let alone the chance of a job afterwards. They’re frightened about slipping into the depths of long-term unemployment before they’ve even had the chance to get into work. We can’t let this continue. Although it got somewhat lost last week in the fanfare of conference, and the continued media frenzy around hypothetical hung parliaments, the Lib Dems launched a manifesto for young people. Our central proposal is to introduce a guarantee that young people will be back into education, employment or training within three months of becoming unemployed. We’ll achieve this by creating more places at universities, and by introducing a new “Paid internship” scheme to allow 800,000 young people to receive a “Training Allowance” of £55 a week, and gain real experience that will help them into full employment later down the line. We need to provide young people with the hope that they will have a positive future, and will at least have the opportunity to realise their potential. Anything else would be criminally letting down a generation that are already suffering enough. That’s the message I’m taking to youngsters in Wirral South, and what I will be fighting for if I’m elected to those green benches in May. Jamie Saddler, 23, is the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Candidate for Wirral South. Photo courtesy of Jamie.

0

Young PPCs week 7: Jamie Saddler

I write this having just spent the weekend in Birmingham at the Lib Dems’ very successful Spring Conference. We’ve had terrific media coverage over the last few days, and Nick Clegg’s speech on Sunday afternoon was fiery, passionate, and very well-received. The message that the Liberal Democrats are the only party who can provide the fair future most people want came through loud and clear, and will resonate well with the public.

Whether it be our plan for fair taxes, giving most people a £700 tax cut, and taking everyone earning under £10,000 out of tax completely; our pledge to give children a fair start by investing an extra £2.5 billion in education, targeted at the most disadvantaged; our promise to create a rebalanced green economy, with emphasis on reviving our manufacturing industry, and splitting up the banks; or our vow to reshape our political system with fair votes, fair funding of parties, and the promise that constituents will have the power to sack corrupt MPs – it is the Liberal Democrats who have the most compelling message going into this election. My job now is to go out and sell that on the doorsteps in Wirral South.

As ever, I’ve been across the length and breadth of the constituency over the past month, talking to a wide variety of groups and individuals. Three weeks ago, I had a bit of an “education day”,  with a visit to three schools in the constituency, talking with other young people about issues that matter to them, and what their future might hold.

It is sad to say that the current outlook is bleak. One in five young people can’t get a job. That’s 6,000 people in my area of the Wirral, and one million across the entire country that are not in education, employment or training (NEETs as they are known), and this number is growing all the time. These are shocking statistics, and show how a generation of promising young people are being left behind.

I count myself very fortunate to have got my current job when I did. It was in October 2008, just before the recession really started to bite. Opportunities since, in almost every sector, have become increasingly scarce. I have friends who graduated from university a year later than me, some with Masters Degrees, who have been left in limbo, unable to find work, and struggling to even get an unpaid internship. Even those of us who were lucky enough to get jobs are crippled by a mountain of student debt.

And it’s a situation that increasingly worries a lot of the young people I meet. One of the three schools I visited was Wirral Grammar School for Girls. I spoke to a group of their sixth form students, who were a lively, engaged group, knowledgeable about a lot of topics and a credit to their school. There were the usual questions on hung parliaments, electoral systems, immigration, and “can the Lib Dems win?” (the answer’s yes by the way, if you were in any doubt!). But in amongst them, there were questions on cuts to university funding, debt and unemployment. Young people have become increasingly apprehensive about the future, worried about whether there’ll even be enough university places for them, let alone the chance of a job afterwards. They’re frightened about slipping into the depths of long-term unemployment before they’ve even had the chance to get into work.

We can’t let this continue. Although it got somewhat lost last week in the fanfare of conference, and the continued media frenzy around hypothetical hung parliaments, the Lib Dems launched a manifesto for young people. Our central proposal is to introduce a guarantee that young people will be back into education, employment or training within three months of becoming unemployed. We’ll achieve this by creating more places at universities, and by introducing a new “Paid internship” scheme to allow 800,000 young people to receive a “Training Allowance” of £55 a week, and gain real experience that will help them into full employment later down the line.

We need to provide young people with the hope that they will have a positive future, and will at least have the opportunity to realise their potential. Anything else would be criminally letting down a generation that are already suffering enough. That’s the message I’m taking to youngsters in Wirral South, and what I will be fighting for if I’m elected to those green benches in May.

Jamie Saddler, 23, is the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Candidate for Wirral South. Photo courtesy of Jamie.

Tags: , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑