Catch21Catch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which produces videos and other new media content to help engage young people with their communities.Catch CreativeThe new video consultancy service from Catch21. Catch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on October 24th, 2010 | by Rosa S
Image © WikiLeaks' release of classified documents about Iraq is getting UK and US officials very hot under the collar. They've been quick to blame the Julian Assange for putting the lives of servicemen at risk, but this kneejerk response exemplifies their reluctance to address the real issue: that what they're are doing abroad just isn't acceptable. What exactly is it then, that's making these leaks headline news?  Well, they reveal that there was a formal order to keep Iraqi torture from being investigated which actively denied the right of Iraqi torture victims to seek justice. They also reveal that there were 15,000 unreported civilian deaths during the Iraq invasion. These are just the “highlights”, check out the Guardian's leading article on the story for more detail. [caption id="" align="alignright" width="240" caption="Ministry of Defence - by Chris Guy on Twitter"]Ministry of Defence[/caption] One viewpoint that is noticeable absent from the that the MoD and State Department criticisms  is that they could go about foreign affairs not doing anything that they're ashamed of. This would mean that leaks wouldn't really be an issue: because after all, WikiLeaks didn't create the facts that their documents reveal about the Iraq invasion - our defence departments did that. And if the abuses didn't exist, then there wouldn't be any need to worry about the security of the personnel responsible for them. (Though there is limited need for this concern anyway, as WikiLeaks specifically removed any information that could be harmful to the individual.) I suppose MoD and State department probably think that this is naïve and impractical view, and maybe you agree. But it's worth remembering that it wasn't so naïve when Obama pledged that the US would become a nation with a moral agenda, one which wasn't seen as a nation responsible for major human rights violations. Back then it was sensible.

1

Misdirected blame: WikiLeaks don’t make the truth

WikiLeaks’ release of classified documents about Iraq is getting UK and US officials very hot under the collar. They’ve been quick to blame the Julian Assange for putting the lives of servicemen at risk, but this kneejerk response exemplifies their reluctance to address the real issue: that what they’re are doing abroad just isn’t acceptable.

What exactly is it then, that’s making these leaks headline news?  Well, they reveal that there was a formal order to keep Iraqi torture from being investigated which actively denied the right of Iraqi torture victims to seek justice. They also reveal that there were 15,000 unreported civilian deaths during the Iraq invasion. These are just the “highlights”, check out the Guardian’s leading article on the story for more detail.

Ministry of Defence

Ministry of Defence – by Chris Guy on Twitter

One viewpoint that is noticeable absent from the that the MoD and State Department criticisms  is that they could go about foreign affairs not doing anything that they’re ashamed of. This would mean that leaks wouldn’t really be an issue: because after all, WikiLeaks didn’t create the facts that their documents reveal about the Iraq invasion – our defence departments did that. And if the abuses didn’t exist, then there wouldn’t be any need to worry about the security of the personnel responsible for them. (Though there is limited need for this concern anyway, as WikiLeaks specifically removed any information that could be harmful to the individual.)

I suppose MoD and State department probably think that this is naïve and impractical view, and maybe you agree. But it’s worth remembering that it wasn’t so naïve when Obama pledged that the US would become a nation with a moral agenda, one which wasn’t seen as a nation responsible for major human rights violations. Back then it was sensible.

Tags: , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑