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Published on July 31st, 2011 | by Lara Cronshaw
Image © [caption id="attachment_3015" align="alignleft" width="209" caption="To Hatch, creator of the IVF Lottery; Giver of life, or guilty of false hope?"][/caption] The IVF Lottery due to be introduced on 30th July by ‘To Hatch,’  is an idea that sparked interesting thoughts into the logistics and morality of such a gamble. Living in an age where choice is paramount to society; how we chose to socialise, using which social network, where we chose to shop and in which country, who we chose to vote for, or in fact, if we chose to vote at all, it seems logical to some that we should have the right to chose to enter such a lottery. Factually, one in seven couples in the UK, are affected by infertility, and essentially the current approach to IVF on the NHS is a lottery itself ruled by ones geographic location, availability and eligibility are determined by postcode. With each cycle costing the NHS between £3,000 and £5,000, and privately up to £8,000, the allure of a £2o ticket  with £25,000 worth of treatment as a prize is clear to see, yet what the draw doesn’t publicise is the endemic false hope this may foster within those whom are already fragile, the thousands of pounds that could ultimately be poured into this lottery on the off chance of winning; which in ordinary gambling is considered quite the norm, but when the stakes are as high as a potential human life, and in fact the emotions, desperation and vulnerability of an existing life, this lottery seems awfully sinister and dangerous to me. The creator of To Hatch, Camille Strachan said: 'We will offer struggling couples a completely tailor made service. We hope the To Hatch Lottery can ease the burden on the NHS and reduce the stress slightly on some of those who are struggling'. However both and the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and the British Fertility Society (BFS) have issued statements outlining their concerns over the proposed lottery. 'We (BFS) are very troubled by the announcement that the charity To Hatch is about to launch an IVF lottery  the scheme highlights the "sorry state of affairs" faced by British infertile couples who were vulnerable to such gimmicks. The HFEA said, ‘using IVF as ‘prize’ in a lottery is wrong and entirely inappropriate.’  Is this an example of a wolf in sheep’s clothing, where false hope is dressed up as choice, choice the entity that our society constantly strives for? Perhaps a sad reflection of the prevailing mind set in certain parts of British society today, or rather a sadly a true chance to provide something exceptionally out of reach to those who would otherwise be excluded. Either way, I imagine this is only the beginning of the debate, it will certinaly be one to watch in coming months both inside and out of the Westminster walls.

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IVF Lottery; A wolf in sheep’s clothing?

To Hatch, creator of the IVF Lottery; Giver of life, or guilty of false hope?

The IVF Lottery due to be introduced on 30th July by ‘To Hatch,’  is an idea that sparked interesting thoughts into the logistics and morality of such a gamble. Living in an age where choice is paramount to society; how we chose to socialise, using which social network, where we chose to shop and in which country, who we chose to vote for, or in fact, if we chose to vote at all, it seems logical to some that we should have the right to chose to enter such a lottery.

Factually, one in seven couples in the UK, are affected by infertility, and essentially the current approach to IVF on the NHS is a lottery itself ruled by ones geographic location, availability and eligibility are determined by postcode. With each cycle costing the NHS between £3,000 and £5,000, and privately up to £8,000, the allure of a £2o ticket  with £25,000 worth of treatment as a prize is clear to see, yet what the draw doesn’t publicise is the endemic false hope this may foster within those whom are already fragile, the thousands of pounds that could ultimately be poured into this lottery on the off chance of winning; which in ordinary gambling is considered quite the norm, but when the stakes are as high as a potential human life, and in fact the emotions, desperation and vulnerability of an existing life, this lottery seems awfully sinister and dangerous to me.

The creator of To Hatch, Camille Strachan said: ‘We will offer struggling couples a completely tailor made service. We hope the To Hatch Lottery can ease the burden on the NHS and reduce the stress slightly on some of those who are struggling’.

However both and the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and the British Fertility Society (BFS) have issued statements outlining their concerns over the proposed lottery. ‘We (BFS) are very troubled by the announcement that the charity To Hatch is about to launch an IVF lottery  the scheme highlights the “sorry state of affairs” faced by British infertile couples who were vulnerable to such gimmicks. The HFEA said, ‘using IVF as ‘prize’ in a lottery is wrong and entirely inappropriate.’ 

Is this an example of a wolf in sheep’s clothing, where false hope is dressed up as choice, choice the entity that our society constantly strives for?

Perhaps a sad reflection of the prevailing mind set in certain parts of British society today, or rather a sadly a true chance to provide something exceptionally out of reach to those who would otherwise be excluded. Either way, I imagine this is only the beginning of the debate, it will certinaly be one to watch in coming months both inside and out of the Westminster walls.

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