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Published on July 6th, 2011 | by Lara Cronshaw
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="322" caption="Mr Cameron, looking dejected, replied: “I take full responsibility.”"]Mr Cameron, looking dejected, replied: “I take full responsibility.”[/caption] The opening mood was subdued and respectful, starting with the party leader’s agreement on the undertaking of potentially two inquiries into the mess that continues to spill out surrounding the NotW; one questioning the behaviour and regulations within the media and the other, the failures within the initial police investigations. Miliband firmly delivered his suggestions and opinions, calling for an immediate public inquiry, looking at the culture and practise, nature of regulation and the practices and ethics of the media and its relationship with the police. It was a then defensive Cameron who dodged responses and hesitated on the correct focus and timing of such an investigation, saying that no such inquiry should begin until the police enquiry is fully completed; which could take years. Failing to agree conclusively on this matter, Miliband moved on to Cameron’s involvement with the figureheads at the centre of the NotW scrutiny, stating he ‘made a catastrophic error of judgment,’ when hiring Andy Coulson. Never one to admit his own mistakes, Cameron simply failed to show any grip he may have had on this situation, and on the much called for sacking of Rebekah Brooks, Cameron evasively glazed over the matter with ‘everyone at News International should take responsibility. The police should be allowed to get on with their work,’ leaving this pot to stew a little longer. Miliband also accused Cameron of being out of touch with public opinion on the issue of BskyB. Miliband called for the BSkyB bid to the Competition Commission. Clearly covered in legal opinion, Cameron appeared to be bound into explaining the technicalities of due process again failing to agree with Miliband. After describing the behaviour of NotW as ‘revolting,’ and claiming to be, ‘so appalled,’ it seems certain Cameron, as well as any, will know hiding behind due process will not wash with the public. One would suspect out of sight from the Cameras in the House of Commons, Cameron will be forced to admit the necessity in finding a much needed loop hole and at the very least provide a moment of much needed ‘breathing space,’ on this subject.

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“The biggest press scandal in modern times” & Cameron “hasn’t shown leadership”

Mr Cameron, looking dejected, replied: “I take full responsibility.”

Mr Cameron, looking dejected, replied: “I take full responsibility.”

The opening mood was subdued and respectful, starting with the party leader’s agreement on the undertaking of potentially two inquiries into the mess that continues to spill out surrounding the NotW; one questioning the behaviour and regulations within the media and the other, the failures within the initial police investigations.

Miliband firmly delivered his suggestions and opinions, calling for an immediate public inquiry, looking at the culture and practise, nature of regulation and the practices and ethics of the media and its relationship with the police. It was a then defensive Cameron who dodged responses and hesitated on the correct focus and timing of such an investigation, saying that no such inquiry should begin until the police enquiry is fully completed; which could take years.

Failing to agree conclusively on this matter, Miliband moved on to Cameron’s involvement with the figureheads at the centre of the NotW scrutiny, stating he ‘made a catastrophic error of judgment,’ when hiring Andy Coulson. Never one to admit his own mistakes, Cameron simply failed to show any grip he may have had on this situation, and on the much called for sacking of Rebekah Brooks, Cameron evasively glazed over the matter with ‘everyone at News International should take responsibility. The police should be allowed to get on with their work,’ leaving this pot to stew a little longer.

Miliband also accused Cameron of being out of touch with public opinion on the issue of BskyB. Miliband called for the BSkyB bid to the Competition Commission. Clearly covered in legal opinion, Cameron appeared to be bound into explaining the technicalities of due process again failing to agree with Miliband. After describing the behaviour of NotW as ‘revolting,’ and claiming to be, ‘so appalled,’ it seems certain Cameron, as well as any, will know hiding behind due process will not wash with the public. One would suspect out of sight from the Cameras in the House of Commons, Cameron will be forced to admit the necessity in finding a much needed loop hole and at the very least provide a moment of much needed ‘breathing space,’ on this subject.

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