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Published on August 3rd, 2011 | by Lara Cronshaw
Image © [caption id="attachment_3041" align="alignleft" width="204" caption="Peace please"][/caption] A brutal and horrific crackdown by the Syrian government has killed hundreds and displaced thousands of its own people. Those who have the security of a life both here and in the US, are in various ways calling on the Western world to help. Four weeks ago a lone taxi driver in New York pleaded to my family and I to help his people. Just two weeks ago at the British 10km run in London protesters gathered and paraded to draw attention and support for the Syrian people, the images projected into our front rooms on various daily news programs tell of the horror that is only beginning to unfold there, but what can we do? I say that with the most factually frank tone; amid mounting concerns the military has fallen below the “minimum utility,”defence cuts are leading to a desperate situation leaving British troops with, mission impossible... unable to carry out effectively their missions in Libya and Afghanistan,’ do we honestly have the resources, or more importantly the right to ‘help’ the Syrian people? Fundamentally if we can help save innocent lives, then we should. Historically and realistically however, it is hugely unlikely that any intervention on our part will reap such a result. Sadly instead, as with the most recent examples in Libya and Afghanistan, and before that Iraq, our interference has led to unprecedented loss of life both for the people of those countries and of our own. Is this a harsh lesson the Western world needs to learn, or do we in fact have a moral obligation to do what we can. Despite a rising death toll in Syria, William Hague firmly ruled out any British involvement in this, ‘frustrating’ crisis and instead called for, ‘countries to concentrate on other ways of influencing the Assad regime [with] stronger international pressure all round...there is no prospect of a legal, morally sanctioned military intervention... It's not [even] a remote possibility.’ It seems the best we can do at this point in time is ‘put pressure on’ for international action, the sad reality of the world we live in is that sometimes these things are outside of our control, and sometimes we should allow them to be that way. With the best intentions in the world, action on our own part may not resolve the situation, the answer to this one, I believe, is yet to be found, and will remain an on-going tragedy and heightened topic of debate for some time yet. The call is for democracy, but how can we morally and lawfully advice on this when our own apparent version of democracy is there to protect a duopoly.

1

Syria; ‘Please help my people.’

Peace please

A brutal and horrific crackdown by the Syrian government has killed hundreds and displaced thousands of its own people. Those who have the security of a life both here and in the US, are in various ways calling on the Western world to help. Four weeks ago a lone taxi driver in New York pleaded to my family and I to help his people. Just two weeks ago at the British 10km run in London protesters gathered and paraded to draw attention and support for the Syrian people, the images projected into our front rooms on various daily news programs tell of the horror that is only beginning to unfold there, but what can we do? I say that with the most factually frank tone; amid mounting concerns the military has fallen below the “minimum utility,”defence cuts are leading to a desperate situation leaving British troops with, mission impossible… unable to carry out effectively their missions in Libya and Afghanistan,’ do we honestly have the resources, or more importantly the right to ‘help’ the Syrian people?

Fundamentally if we can help save innocent lives, then we should. Historically and realistically however, it is hugely unlikely that any intervention on our part will reap such a result. Sadly instead, as with the most recent examples in Libya and Afghanistan, and before that Iraq, our interference has led to unprecedented loss of life both for the people of those countries and of our own. Is this a harsh lesson the Western world needs to learn, or do we in fact have a moral obligation to do what we can.

Despite a rising death toll in Syria, William Hague firmly ruled out any British involvement in this, ‘frustrating’ crisis and instead called for, ‘countries to concentrate on other ways of influencing the Assad regime [with] stronger international pressure all round…there is no prospect of a legal, morally sanctioned military intervention… It’s not [even] a remote possibility.’

It seems the best we can do at this point in time is ‘put pressure on’ for international action, the sad reality of the world we live in is that sometimes these things are outside of our control, and sometimes we should allow them to be that way. With the best intentions in the world, action on our own part may not resolve the situation, the answer to this one, I believe, is yet to be found, and will remain an on-going tragedy and heightened topic of debate for some time yet.

The call is for democracy, but how can we morally and lawfully advice on this when our own apparent version of democracy is there to protect a duopoly.

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