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Published on September 27th, 2011 | by Joe Hinds
Image © [caption id="attachment_3786" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Ed Miliband at the Labour Party Conference; Post Nose Job ©Phil Noble/Reuters"][/caption] During his hour long speech at the Labour Party Conference in "Labour Liverpool" Ed Miliband today praises, among other points, the need for a "new bargain" within society, challenges those on benefits who do not seek work and condemns the Tories for instilling the wrong values on the country as he makes his strongest speech so far as Leader of the Opposition but one that still could (and should) have been better. Miliband continually highlighted how the current government's austerity plans are failing the country, with the raising of taxes and the continued cuts on spending having nothing but a detrimental effect on our economy, with Labour instead looking to cut VAT and offer a workers' bonus levy as an incentive to put the young unemployed back to work. Strong personal criticism of David Cameron was made throughout the speech, most notably during Miliband's evaluation of the riots in which he refused, unlike Cameron, to "write off whole parts of the country as sick". Criticism continued when the agenda turned to that of the NHS in which Miliband reminded us that the Labour Party were not only the creators of "Britain's Greatest Public Service" but were also the only party that could be trusted with caring for it, highlighting an extensive list of broken promises made by Cameron himself regarding the NHS (and there clearly wasn't enough time in this speech to highlight all of Clegg's broken promises to the electorate) and how his notion of 'we're all in this together' has somehow resulted in the Tories calling for a cut to the 50% tax on the rich of the country, implying once again (and rightly so) that so far it has been the poor who have faced the brunt of these hard times. Aside from this, one of the main features of the speech seemed to be the need for a new set of values within the country and in particular within the economy, in which Miliband repeated time and time again how Labour were 'pro-business' but in support of genuine producers for our country, rather than "predator companies which have been taking too much from us" (he went on to state how the energy companies have "ripped us off"). However, despite adhering to later attack those who are on benefits, announce that tuition fees would be capped at £6000 under Labour Government and fail to support the workers' strikes scheduled for November 30th, all things that are in no doubt an attempt to increase his popularity at the expense of ideology, there still remains some doubt as to whether or not Ed has done enough here to resonate with the mass electorate and to finally portray himself as a truly electable Prime Minister?  

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Miliband’s New Bargain?

Ed Miliband at the Labour Party Conference; Post Nose Job ©Phil Noble/Reuters

During his hour long speech at the Labour Party Conference in “Labour Liverpool” Ed Miliband today praises, among other points, the need for a “new bargain” within society, challenges those on benefits who do not seek work and condemns the Tories for instilling the wrong values on the country as he makes his strongest speech so far as Leader of the Opposition but one that still could (and should) have been better.

Miliband continually highlighted how the current government’s austerity plans are failing the country, with the raising of taxes and the continued cuts on spending having nothing but a detrimental effect on our economy, with Labour instead looking to cut VAT and offer a workers’ bonus levy as an incentive to put the young unemployed back to work.

Strong personal criticism of David Cameron was made throughout the speech, most notably during Miliband’s evaluation of the riots in which he refused, unlike Cameron, to “write off whole parts of the country as sick“. Criticism continued when the agenda turned to that of the NHS in which Miliband reminded us that the Labour Party were not only the creators of “Britain’s Greatest Public Service” but were also the only party that could be trusted with caring for it, highlighting an extensive list of broken promises made by Cameron himself regarding the NHS (and there clearly wasn’t enough time in this speech to highlight all of Clegg’s broken promises to the electorate) and how his notion of ‘we’re all in this together’ has somehow resulted in the Tories calling for a cut to the 50% tax on the rich of the country, implying once again (and rightly so) that so far it has been the poor who have faced the brunt of these hard times.

Aside from this, one of the main features of the speech seemed to be the need for a new set of values within the country and in particular within the economy, in which Miliband repeated time and time again how Labour were ‘pro-business’ but in support of genuine producers for our country, rather than “predator companies which have been taking too much from us” (he went on to state how the energy companies have “ripped us off”).

However, despite adhering to later attack those who are on benefits, announce that tuition fees would be capped at £6000 under Labour Government and fail to support the workers’ strikes scheduled for November 30th, all things that are in no doubt an attempt to increase his popularity at the expense of ideology, there still remains some doubt as to whether or not Ed has done enough here to resonate with the mass electorate and to finally portray himself as a truly electable Prime Minister?

 

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