Catch21Catch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which produces videos and other new media content to help engage young people with their communities.Catch CreativeThe new video consultancy service from Catch21. Catch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on September 29th, 2011 | by Luca Gastaldi
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="240" caption="Saudi Women Drives for her Rights © Robert Reed Daly"][/caption] Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah overturned a court sentence condemning a woman to ten lashings for breaking the ban on female driving. At present, women are allowed to ride a car in Saudi Arabia only if accompanied by a man. The news comes after the announcement, two days ago, that Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in the municipal elections of 2015. Earlier this week, Slate pointed out how the issue of being allowed to drive outweighs the concession on voting for Saudi women. Since elections decide for only half of the seats on municipal councils, while the monarchy nominates the remaining half and appoints mayors, voting gives citizens very limited political power. In addition, government has the power to postpone elections - as it did in 2009 -  and there is no guarantee that King Abdullah will maintain his promise. On the other hand, forcing the female driving ban has the potential to unsettle the guardian system that Saudi women are subject to. Women have to seek permission from a male family member to participate in public life, go to the doctor, travel or even get dressed. Saudi conservatives fear that allowing women to drive could destabilise a system based on strict control and segregation, and diminish male authority in society. The ban has been contested for more than twenty years, since in 1990 a group of fifteen women drove around the Saudi capital, Riyadh, in an act of defiance that led to their arrest. More recently, the women2drive campaign encouraged women to post on youtube videos of themselves driving a car, in an attempt to put the monarchy under pressure. Slate suggests that a lift of the ban would have revolutionary potential: it would reduce family control over women and allow them to look for work, a partner and even to organise politically. Will King Abdullah allow it to happen? (h/t ilpost)

0

Saudi women drive for their rights

Saudi Women Drives for her Rights © Robert Reed Daly

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah overturned a court sentence condemning a woman to ten lashings for breaking the ban on female driving. At present, women are allowed to ride a car in Saudi Arabia only if accompanied by a man. The news comes after the announcement, two days ago, that Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in the municipal elections of 2015.

Earlier this week, Slate pointed out how the issue of being allowed to drive outweighs the concession on voting for Saudi women. Since elections decide for only half of the seats on municipal councils, while the monarchy nominates the remaining half and appoints mayors, voting gives citizens very limited political power. In addition, government has the power to postpone elections – as it did in 2009 –  and there is no guarantee that King Abdullah will maintain his promise.

On the other hand, forcing the female driving ban has the potential to unsettle the guardian system that Saudi women are subject to. Women have to seek permission from a male family member to participate in public life, go to the doctor, travel or even get dressed. Saudi conservatives fear that allowing women to drive could destabilise a system based on strict control and segregation, and diminish male authority in society. The ban has been contested for more than twenty years, since in 1990 a group of fifteen women drove around the Saudi capital, Riyadh, in an act of defiance that led to their arrest. More recently, the women2drive campaign encouraged women to post on youtube videos of themselves driving a car, in an attempt to put the monarchy under pressure. Slate suggests that a lift of the ban would have revolutionary potential: it would reduce family control over women and allow them to look for work, a partner and even to organise politically. Will King Abdullah allow it to happen?

(h/t ilpost)

Tags: , , , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑