Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on October 25th, 2011 | by Ben Phillips
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Conservative arch-Eurosceptic"]Photo credit: Nick Pickles[/caption] The outcome of last night's EU referendum vote in the Commons was, for David Cameron, worse than expected. Eighty-one Tories voted against the government line, while a further fifteen abstained; the aggressive cajoling of the party whips failed to prevent the biggest backbench rebellion endured by a Conservative prime minister in the post-war era. For the Tory right, the conclusion drawn from last night is simple: the PM now has no choice but to sign an unconditional surrender over Europe on their terms.  'This should be a wake-up call to David Cameron', writes the Spectator's James Forsyth. 'He needs to develop a proper policy for repatriating powers from Brussels, change his style of party management, and reform the Whips office.' Likewise, for Conservative Home's Tim Montgomerie, writing in the Guardian, the rebellion was not simply an expression of Euroscepticism: it also owed much to a broad dissatisfaction within the party at the sense of Cameron's overly-relaxed leadership style and his disconnect from the Conservative grassroots. Yet Montgomerie's threat that 'unless Cameron becomes a lot more collegiate, it's only going to get worse' is difficult to read other than as a demand for capitulation to the party's pervasive right-wing enthusiasms, amongst which the fixation with Europe, the Guardian's leader reminds us, has long been foremost:

'What does one say about an atavistic party whose two previous prime ministers were both brought down by Europe, whose last government was wrecked by the issue, and which now, even so, seems determined to humiliate another leader in the same way[?]'
Montgomerie's Guardian column betrays a confidence that the Conservative obsession with Europe is commensurate to the strength of public feeling on the matter. Yet is it really? A Guardian/ICM poll published today suggests that 70% of the general public want a referendum on EU membership, but such a question asked in isolation is by no means mutually exclusive with broader surveys, pointed to by Polly Toynbee and Mary Riddell, which suggest that Europe is a relatively minute concern for voters. Cameron clearly has been aware of this latter consideration: upon assuming the leadership in 2006, he told his party to 'stop obsessing about Europe'. As Riddell points out, this may answer the question of why exactly he felt the need to have such a confrontation with his own party, rather than simply allowing a peaceable free vote. In unleashing, in her words, 'forces that may yet make John Major’s 'bastards' seem like angels of mercy', Cameron may have begun a bid to break a debilitating Eurosceptic strangehold on his own ranks.

0

After the referendum vote: Cameron’s next move

Photo credit: Nick Pickles

Conservative arch-Eurosceptic

The outcome of last night’s EU referendum vote in the Commons was, for David Cameron, worse than expected. Eighty-one Tories voted against the government line, while a further fifteen abstained; the aggressive cajoling of the party whips failed to prevent the biggest backbench rebellion endured by a Conservative prime minister in the post-war era. For the Tory right, the conclusion drawn from last night is simple: the PM now has no choice but to sign an unconditional surrender over Europe on their terms.  ‘This should be a wake-up call to David Cameron’, writes the Spectator‘s James Forsyth. ‘He needs to develop a proper policy for repatriating powers from Brussels, change his style of party management, and reform the Whips office.’ Likewise, for Conservative Home‘s Tim Montgomerie, writing in the Guardian, the rebellion was not simply an expression of Euroscepticism: it also owed much to a broad dissatisfaction within the party at the sense of Cameron’s overly-relaxed leadership style and his disconnect from the Conservative grassroots. Yet Montgomerie’s threat that ‘unless Cameron becomes a lot more collegiate, it’s only going to get worse’ is difficult to read other than as a demand for capitulation to the party’s pervasive right-wing enthusiasms, amongst which the fixation with Europe, the Guardian‘s leader reminds us, has long been foremost:

‘What does one say about an atavistic party whose two previous prime ministers were both brought down by Europe, whose last government was wrecked by the issue, and which now, even so, seems determined to humiliate another leader in the same way[?]’

Montgomerie’s Guardian column betrays a confidence that the Conservative obsession with Europe is commensurate to the strength of public feeling on the matter. Yet is it really? A Guardian/ICM poll published today suggests that 70% of the general public want a referendum on EU membership, but such a question asked in isolation is by no means mutually exclusive with broader surveys, pointed to by Polly Toynbee and Mary Riddell, which suggest that Europe is a relatively minute concern for voters. Cameron clearly has been aware of this latter consideration: upon assuming the leadership in 2006, he told his party to ‘stop obsessing about Europe’. As Riddell points out, this may answer the question of why exactly he felt the need to have such a confrontation with his own party, rather than simply allowing a peaceable free vote. In unleashing, in her words, ‘forces that may yet make John Major’s ‘bastards’ seem like angels of mercy’, Cameron may have begun a bid to break a debilitating Eurosceptic strangehold on his own ranks.

Tags: , , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑