Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on October 27th, 2011 | by Lorna Gledhill
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="350" caption="The 99% take a stand on the steps of St Paul's Cathedral (c) wheelzwheeler"]Occupy London[/caption] Chancellor Canon Dr Giles Fraser has today resigned from his post at St.Paul’s Cathedral. The liberal Anglican has stated on Twitter “it is with great regret and sadness that I have handed in my notice at St Paul’s Cathedral.” A day before the Cathedral is to be reopened after being closed by the Dean for the first time since World War Two, the resignation of Dr Giles Fraser raises the issue of divisions within the clergy in their attitudes to the Occupy London Stock Exchange (OLSX) protesters who have set up camp outside the tourist attraction. The Cathedral has been closed for a week due to “health and safety” regulations, causing a supposed loss of £20,000 a day in takings from tourists. Spokesmen and women from the OLSX camp have reiterated that there has been consistent cooperation with St Pauls to minimise disruption. Tim Williams, from OLSX, stated that the organisers and officials were “all working together” and OLSX have invited an independent health and safety auditor to inspect the camp. Dr Giles Fraser, despite normally being out of the media spotlight, became famous for shooing police officers off the steps of St Paul’s on the first night of the OLSX camp 12 days ago. In the early days of the camp, Fraser also delivered a Sunday sermon declaring the sin of corporate greed, seemingly aligning his own personal and religious views with the sentiment of the protest camp outside. According to The Guardian, “Anglicans either love or loathe his liberal views.” As various officials have begun asking for the protesters to leave the camp, Fraser has not followed suit. Boris Johnson, cathedral officials and the Corporation of London have all issued statements acknowledging the right to protest, but essentially have put a time limit on the actions of OLSX. As these bodies have gathered to edge out the protesters from St Paul’s Cathedral’s Churchyard, it is understood that Fraser believed his position to be untenable. In a statement made today, Dr Giles Fraser declared, “I resigned because I believe that the chapter has set on a course of action that could mean there will be violence in the name of the church.” As the Corporation of London begins to make plans to take legal action to remove the protesters, it is believed that Dr Giles Fraser’s views began to grate against the majority of the clergy. Unfortunately, protesters and their supporters have another reason to be angry with the officials of St Pauls. The cathedral has strong ties with its financial neighbours, with individuals such as Carol Sergeant, the chief risk director for Lloyds Banking Group, acting as foundation trustees. The Church of England’s investment ventures are also slightly suspect, with multimillion-pound shareholdings being maintained in HSBC, Barclays and Lloyds Banking Group. With a group of protesters focusing on corporate greed and financial justice, the Cathedral’s links with some of the biggest tax dodging UK companies are not likely to go unnoticed. The famous publicist Max Clifford has stated that he thinks the decision to close St Paul’s Cathedral was a PR disaster: “I was brought up to believe that a church was a place where people would find refuge. It’s a very damaging stance they’re taking.” With Fraser’s reputation as an explicit and controversial (within the Church of England) mouthpiece, it seems that the clergy predicted an increasing cross-contamination of politics and religion and started to fear the fallout. Whilst to Fraser “financial justice is a gospel imperative”, the officialdom seems less sure. Dr Giles Fraser’s resignation, whilst being an amazing declaration of personal integrity and belief, is not a victory for the protesters. It feels more like political manoeuvring within the clergy and a gentle rebalance of consensus amongst the officials at St Pauls. OLSX have issued the following statement: “he ensured that St Paul’s could be a sanctuary for us and that no violence could take place against peaceful protesters with a legitimate cause – challenging and tackling social and economic injustice in London, the UK and beyond.” The Dean’s statement that Fraser brought a “unique contribution” to St Paul’s Cathedral couldn’t possibly be more accurate.

1

Chancellor Canon of St Paul’s Cathedral resigns

Occupy London

The 99% take a stand on the steps of St Paul's Cathedral (c) wheelzwheeler

Chancellor Canon Dr Giles Fraser has today resigned from his post at St.Paul’s Cathedral. The liberal Anglican has stated on Twitter “it is with great regret and sadness that I have handed in my notice at St Paul’s Cathedral.” A day before the Cathedral is to be reopened after being closed by the Dean for the first time since World War Two, the resignation of Dr Giles Fraser raises the issue of divisions within the clergy in their attitudes to the Occupy London Stock Exchange (OLSX) protesters who have set up camp outside the tourist attraction.

The Cathedral has been closed for a week due to “health and safety” regulations, causing a supposed loss of £20,000 a day in takings from tourists. Spokesmen and women from the OLSX camp have reiterated that there has been consistent cooperation with St Pauls to minimise disruption. Tim Williams, from OLSX, stated that the organisers and officials were “all working together” and OLSX have invited an independent health and safety auditor to inspect the camp.

Dr Giles Fraser, despite normally being out of the media spotlight, became famous for shooing police officers off the steps of St Paul’s on the first night of the OLSX camp 12 days ago. In the early days of the camp, Fraser also delivered a Sunday sermon declaring the sin of corporate greed, seemingly aligning his own personal and religious views with the sentiment of the protest camp outside. According to The Guardian, “Anglicans either love or loathe his liberal views.”

As various officials have begun asking for the protesters to leave the camp, Fraser has not followed suit. Boris Johnson, cathedral officials and the Corporation of London have all issued statements acknowledging the right to protest, but essentially have put a time limit on the actions of OLSX. As these bodies have gathered to edge out the protesters from St Paul’s Cathedral’s Churchyard, it is understood that Fraser believed his position to be untenable. In a statement made today, Dr Giles Fraser declared, “I resigned because I believe that the chapter has set on a course of action that could mean there will be violence in the name of the church.” As the Corporation of London begins to make plans to take legal action to remove the protesters, it is believed that Dr Giles Fraser’s views began to grate against the majority of the clergy.

Unfortunately, protesters and their supporters have another reason to be angry with the officials of St Pauls. The cathedral has strong ties with its financial neighbours, with individuals such as Carol Sergeant, the chief risk director for Lloyds Banking Group, acting as foundation trustees. The Church of England’s investment ventures are also slightly suspect, with multimillion-pound shareholdings being maintained in HSBC, Barclays and Lloyds Banking Group. With a group of protesters focusing on corporate greed and financial justice, the Cathedral’s links with some of the biggest tax dodging UK companies are not likely to go unnoticed.

The famous publicist Max Clifford has stated that he thinks the decision to close St Paul’s Cathedral was a PR disaster: “I was brought up to believe that a church was a place where people would find refuge. It’s a very damaging stance they’re taking.” With Fraser’s reputation as an explicit and controversial (within the Church of England) mouthpiece, it seems that the clergy predicted an increasing cross-contamination of politics and religion and started to fear the fallout. Whilst to Fraser “financial justice is a gospel imperative”, the officialdom seems less sure.

Dr Giles Fraser’s resignation, whilst being an amazing declaration of personal integrity and belief, is not a victory for the protesters. It feels more like political manoeuvring within the clergy and a gentle rebalance of consensus amongst the officials at St Pauls. OLSX have issued the following statement: “he ensured that St Paul’s could be a sanctuary for us and that no violence could take place against peaceful protesters with a legitimate cause – challenging and tackling social and economic injustice in London, the UK and beyond.” The Dean’s statement that Fraser brought a “unique contribution” to St Paul’s Cathedral couldn’t possibly be more accurate.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑