Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on October 22nd, 2011 | by David Christie
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="260" caption="A supporter of the Libyan rebels celebrates in Tripoli on 1 September, shortly after Gaddafi's forces were defeated in the capital. Image from Ammar Abd Rabbo's photostream"]A supporter of the Libyan rebels celebrates in Tripoli on 1 September, shortly after Gaddafi's forces were defeated in the capital.  Image from Ammar Abd Rabbo's photostream[/caption] The way in which Gaddafi met his end could be an indication of how disorganised the new Libyan authorities are.  Although it was initially claimed that Gaddafi had died of injuries sustained in a shoot-out, it now appears that he died as the result of an extra-judicial execution, but the new government, the National Transitional Council, would probably have preferred to see him put on trialThe lack of discipline among the rebel forces is the likely reason why the NTC were not able to ensure that Gaddafi was kept alive once he was captured.  The fighters loyal to the NTC do not consist, for the most part, of trained and disciplined soldiers, but informal groups of militias and ordinary people carrying arms. This poses worrying questions for the future of Libya, as it suggests that law and order could easily break down.  With multiple armed groups in the country, who are not under the firm control of any central authority and indifferent to liberal niceties like the Geneva Convention (which prohibits, among other crimes, the execution of prisoners of war), there could be a descent into violent chaos.  Despite the death of Gadaffi and the defeat of his regime, there are also several tribes loyal to him who may try to obstruct the NTC, if they are not offered a role in the new government. The threat of further conflict is exacerbated by political divisions within the NTC itself between liberal secularists and conservative Islamists, and the next stage of the Libyan revolution could be another civil war, this time betwen these two groups.  Given that the Libyan revolution is the most complete of all the Arab revolutions, with the old regime having been completely smashed (unlike in Egypt, where the military seems to be hanging on to power), the outcome of this next conflict could be seen as setting a precedent for how the other Arab revolutions will develop. Gaddafi was a brutal and murderous tyrant, and many people, particularly in Libya itself, belive that he got what was coming to him.  It should also be remembered that the abuses committed by the rebels are dwarfed by the catalogue of human rights violations committed under Gaddafi’s rule.  Nevertheless, the way in which he was killed could set a worrying trend for how subsequent events will unfold.  To avoid further conflict and ensure that human rights are protected in the new Libya, it is imperative that the secular and democratic forces of the revolution establish the rule of law, disarm Islamist and tribal militias, and prevent any more extra-judicial killings or torture.  Whether they are strong enough to achieve this is still an open question.

0

Will the new Libya be able to hold itself together?

A supporter of the Libyan rebels celebrates in Tripoli on 1 September, shortly after Gaddafi's forces were defeated in the capital.  Image from Ammar Abd Rabbo's photostream

A supporter of the Libyan rebels celebrates in Tripoli on 1 September, shortly after Gaddafi's forces were defeated in the capital. Image from Ammar Abd Rabbo's photostream

The way in which Gaddafi met his end could be an indication of how disorganised the new Libyan authorities are.  Although it was initially claimed that Gaddafi had died of injuries sustained in a shoot-out, it now appears that he died as the result of an extra-judicial execution, but the new government, the National Transitional Council, would probably have preferred to see him put on trialThe lack of discipline among the rebel forces is the likely reason why the NTC were not able to ensure that Gaddafi was kept alive once he was captured.  The fighters loyal to the NTC do not consist, for the most part, of trained and disciplined soldiers, but informal groups of militias and ordinary people carrying arms.

This poses worrying questions for the future of Libya, as it suggests that law and order could easily break down.  With multiple armed groups in the country, who are not under the firm control of any central authority and indifferent to liberal niceties like the Geneva Convention (which prohibits, among other crimes, the execution of prisoners of war), there could be a descent into violent chaos.  Despite the death of Gadaffi and the defeat of his regime, there are also several tribes loyal to him who may try to obstruct the NTC, if they are not offered a role in the new government.

The threat of further conflict is exacerbated by political divisions within the NTC itself between liberal secularists and conservative Islamists, and the next stage of the Libyan revolution could be another civil war, this time betwen these two groups.  Given that the Libyan revolution is the most complete of all the Arab revolutions, with the old regime having been completely smashed (unlike in Egypt, where the military seems to be hanging on to power), the outcome of this next conflict could be seen as setting a precedent for how the other Arab revolutions will develop.

Gaddafi was a brutal and murderous tyrant, and many people, particularly in Libya itself, belive that he got what was coming to him.  It should also be remembered that the abuses committed by the rebels are dwarfed by the catalogue of human rights violations committed under Gaddafi’s rule.  Nevertheless, the way in which he was killed could set a worrying trend for how subsequent events will unfold.  To avoid further conflict and ensure that human rights are protected in the new Libya, it is imperative that the secular and democratic forces of the revolution establish the rule of law, disarm Islamist and tribal militias, and prevent any more extra-judicial killings or torture.  Whether they are strong enough to achieve this is still an open question.

Tags: , , , , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑