Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Blog no image

Published on November 29th, 2011 | by Lauren Beard
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="280" caption=""Unemployment is the result of a lack of jobs": well done, George © Rolo's photostream"][/caption] This afternoon, Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne delivered his Autumn Statement, which updated MPs on the state of the economy and outlined government plans for the future. Prior to his statement, details of credit easing, youth employment schemes and infrastructure investment had already been released. The tone of the statement was set early on with a desperate Osborne announcing growth forecasts were massively down on the figures he gave in March’s budget. The size of the UK’s economy is now only projected to grow by 0.9% in 2011, down from 1.7. 2012 prediction is even worst, now at 0.7%, which is considered optimistic by leading economists and is itself a downsizing of 1.8%. Not surprisingly, Osborne launched into a series of excuses for the lack of growth, ranging from the crisis in Europe and ‘Eurogeddon’ to the previous Labour government’s spending. After basing his pledge to increase prospects for growth on the political calendar by claiming to clear up the mess Labour left behind before the next election, rather than basing his plans on what is feasible  in the current economic climate, he has created a mess for himself as there is no chance that this can be achieved. As expected, Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls, attacked the government’s ‘reckless’, ‘cobbled together’ package for cutting too far, too fast which has ‘ripped out the foundations’ and left the economy vulnerable and made recovery harder, leaving the UK feeling ‘all of the pain but none of the gain’. While this is a fair analysis of Osborne’s fiscal mandate, what would Labour have done differently? It is clear judging from the Office for Budget Responsibility’s borrowing projections for Osborne’s plan and Alistair Darling’s proposals, borrowing under the current government will be £111 billion higher than Darling’s plan. Labour claimed that they would have borrowed in order to fund growth that could have pulled Britain out of debt, rather than to meet the cost of high unemployment as Osborne has done. In any case, it is clear that the current strategy has failed, the increase in borrowing projections means Osborne will miss his deficit reduction to eliminate the UK’s structural deficit by the end of the current parliament. For a government which has prided itself on its deficit reduction program, todays OBR figures strike a huge blow at its economic competence.

0

Osborne’s Autumn Statement: Economic Forecast is Grim

"Unemployment is the result of a lack of jobs": well done, George © Rolo's photostream

This afternoon, Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne delivered his Autumn Statement, which updated MPs on the state of the economy and outlined government plans for the future. Prior to his statement, details of credit easing, youth employment schemes and infrastructure investment had already been released.

The tone of the statement was set early on with a desperate Osborne announcing growth forecasts were massively down on the figures he gave in March’s budget. The size of the UK’s economy is now only projected to grow by 0.9% in 2011, down from 1.7. 2012 prediction is even worst, now at 0.7%, which is considered optimistic by leading economists and is itself a downsizing of 1.8%.

Not surprisingly, Osborne launched into a series of excuses for the lack of growth, ranging from the crisis in Europe and ‘Eurogeddon’ to the previous Labour government’s spending. After basing his pledge to increase prospects for growth on the political calendar by claiming to clear up the mess Labour left behind before the next election, rather than basing his plans on what is feasible  in the current economic climate, he has created a mess for himself as there is no chance that this can be achieved.

As expected, Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls, attacked the government’s ‘reckless’, ‘cobbled together’ package for cutting too far, too fast which has ‘ripped out the foundations’ and left the economy vulnerable and made recovery harder, leaving the UK feeling ‘all of the pain but none of the gain’. While this is a fair analysis of Osborne’s fiscal mandate, what would Labour have done differently? It is clear judging from the Office for Budget Responsibility’s borrowing projections for Osborne’s plan and Alistair Darling’s proposals, borrowing under the current government will be £111 billion higher than Darling’s plan. Labour claimed that they would have borrowed in order to fund growth that could have pulled Britain out of debt, rather than to meet the cost of high unemployment as Osborne has done.

In any case, it is clear that the current strategy has failed, the increase in borrowing projections means Osborne will miss his deficit reduction to eliminate the UK’s structural deficit by the end of the current parliament. For a government which has prided itself on its deficit reduction program, todays OBR figures strike a huge blow at its economic competence.

Tags: , , , , ,


About the Author



Back to Top ↑