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Published on January 7th, 2012 | by Ryan Austin
Image © [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="323" caption="David Cameron To Invest In Britain's Young Entrepreneurs | © Graham Schofield"][/caption]

A record breaking recession, and a record breaking youthful depression. Two things that aren’t only on Cameron's conscience entering 2012, but Britain’s. 
From the ambitious Youth Contract to the perplexing Positive For Youth Strategy: some of the many recent Whitehall published papers that aim to tackle one of Britain's largest problems: The Youthful depression. Amidst these carefully knitted phrases of motivation lies a chilling truth. A truth that 2012 is going to be the year where the battle against youth unemployment is either won or lost. Britain’s young people have had one of the most challenging years in decades. With a record unemployment level at over 1 million, a cut in Educational Allowance and a colossal rise in tuition fees, Britain’s young generation are left in the wilderness with their childhood dreams broken and optimism low. However, as David Cameron announces his inspiration to invest in both the talent of motivated young people and the UK economy, a glimmer of hope is displayed to Britain’s energised, gifted and motivated young people. Cameron's potential offering of government loans to young business visionaries comes as a much anticipated injection into both Britain's talented consortium of young people and the UK's darkening economy. At present those young people who can't conform to the conventional mould of further education are left isolated, lost and detached from society as their passion is neither supported nor invested in by Government. But now we see hope. Hope in Nick Clegg's personal motive to destroy youth unemployment, hope in Cameron's investment into young businesses and hope in the role young people will play in forming the foundations of a truly Big Society. The horrific scenes we saw during the summer of lawless lootings, raging riots and violent attacks showed an ill section of society that felt shunned and oppressed. This disengagement prevails still months on as a severe threat to society, but as echoed in Archbishop Rowan Williams's statement, when young peoples' energy, enthusiasm and gifts are used, Britain's broken society will recover. Of course the riots were a despicable  and atrocious event, however it was also an outcry, an expression, a call for help, and it's mine, yours and the governments' duty to cure this ill minority by equipping them with the resources they so desperately need to employ their talent, skills and motivation to make a difference. Britain’s had a hard year, and as much as the Government will hope the approaching royal rhetoric and Olympic enthusiasm will keep morale high, the new year of 2012 will be a juxtaposed road of success with few open roads, many break downs and frequent delays. But there is promise. As we've heard, the Government have started construction on this new road which will bring new opportunities to those young people who choose to endeavour through perseverance and embark on a journey of a lifetime. The government is listening, and with Cameron's acknowledgement of Britain’s motivated youth as the solution to Britain's problem of a demotivated economy, 2012 may be the year young people have been waiting for. 2012 could be the year when Britain realises that talent, motivation and passion are the answers to its economic problems. 2012 could be the year where a so-called Lost generation find their way in Britain's Big Society: 2012 could be the year Britain's youth receives a much needed injection.

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Cameron’s Youthful Injection

David Cameron To Invest In Britain's Young Entrepreneurs | © Graham Schofield

A record breaking recession, and a record breaking youthful depression. Two things that aren’t only on Cameron’s conscience entering 2012, but Britain’s. 

From the ambitious Youth Contract to the perplexing Positive For Youth Strategy: some of the many recent Whitehall published papers that aim to tackle one of Britain’s largest problems: The Youthful depression. Amidst these carefully knitted phrases of motivation lies a chilling truth. A truth that 2012 is going to be the year where the battle against youth unemployment is either won or lost.

Britain’s young people have had one of the most challenging years in decades. With a record unemployment level at over 1 million, a cut in Educational Allowance and a colossal rise in tuition fees, Britain’s young generation are left in the wilderness with their childhood dreams broken and optimism low. However, as David Cameron announces his inspiration to invest in both the talent of motivated young people and the UK economy, a glimmer of hope is displayed to Britain’s energised, gifted and motivated young people. Cameron’s potential offering of government loans to young business visionaries comes as a much anticipated injection into both Britain’s talented consortium of young people and the UK’s darkening economy.

At present those young people who can’t conform to the conventional mould of further education are left isolated, lost and detached from society as their passion is neither supported nor invested in by Government. But now we see hope. Hope in Nick Clegg’s personal motive to destroy youth unemployment, hope in Cameron’s investment into young businesses and hope in the role young people will play in forming the foundations of a truly Big Society.

The horrific scenes we saw during the summer of lawless lootings, raging riots and violent attacks showed an ill section of society that felt shunned and oppressed. This disengagement prevails still months on as a severe threat to society, but as echoed in Archbishop Rowan Williams’s statement, when young peoples’ energy, enthusiasm and gifts are used, Britain’s broken society will recover. Of course the riots were a despicable  and atrocious event, however it was also an outcry, an expression, a call for help, and it’s mine, yours and the governments’ duty to cure this ill minority by equipping them with the resources they so desperately need to employ their talent, skills and motivation to make a difference.

Britain’s had a hard year, and as much as the Government will hope the approaching royal rhetoric and Olympic enthusiasm will keep morale high, the new year of 2012 will be a juxtaposed road of success with few open roads, many break downs and frequent delays. But there is promise. As we’ve heard, the Government have started construction on this new road which will bring new opportunities to those young people who choose to endeavour through perseverance and embark on a journey of a lifetime.

The government is listening, and with Cameron’s acknowledgement of Britain’s motivated youth as the solution to Britain’s problem of a demotivated economy, 2012 may be the year young people have been waiting for. 2012 could be the year when Britain realises that talent, motivation and passion are the answers to its economic problems. 2012 could be the year where a so-called Lost generation find their way in Britain’s Big Society: 2012 could be the year Britain’s youth receives a much needed injection.

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  • Olliron

    Building the Big Society – more like 'repairing the broken society' for the foreseeable years, but the idea is appealing

  • Yes. The Big Society is the medicine, if you would like, I mentioned in the article. As also mentioned, the riots showed the sheer need for cooperation, peace and unity between society no matter what race, creed or class. The fact remains that Britain needs to find a universal identity and culture that includes the young. The Americans have mastered this.

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