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Published on January 10th, 2012 | by Sam Hargreaves
Image © [caption id="attachment_6419" align="alignleft" width="226" caption="Miliband is taking a big risk. Will it pay off? ©BobPetUK"][/caption] What would you do for a salary of 66k? For most young people it’s a salary they can only dream about. Six jobs promising this salary have just been advertised on the Labour party website. The six posts are for executive directors covering every facet of the party, an attempt at a complete revolution in the way the party is being run. This attempt to fundamentally change the party structure seems to have slipped under the media radar for the moment, we must ask ourselves what has prompted this 396k hiring spree? Hiring a whole new senior team could be indications of two things, panic, or confidence within the Labour leadership. Labour has many reasons which could cause it to panic at this time, its poll numbers have remained stagnant during a period of economic instability, a time where an opposition party should be capitalising on the government's perceived failures and inspiring voters that Labour are a viable alternative to the current government. This restructuring could be seen as an act of a leadership worried that unless it does something radical it may start facing challenges from within its own ranks. Labour also has reasons to be confident, especially if they can remember their history. After a long period of governance a party typically has problems adjusting to being out of power. After the 1997 elections the Conservative party was in chaos following its defeat and it took many years to reorganise itself to an effective election fighting force. Labour as a party is far more united than the Conservatives were post 1997, the party may be gambling that it may be able to do in one term what its Conservative opponents managed to do in three. Many paragraphs will be written analysing the Milliband leadership, I’m not going to add to them, I will however ask this, in a time of economic uncertainty can the party justify spending this amount of money of six directors, while attacking the other parties for being on the side of the top tier of society? It states something very apt on the back of a Labour membership card which the Labour HQ might want to take a look at: ‘By the strength of our common endeavour we achieve more than we achieve alone’ The political parties have all become slick professional operations, where the membership and volunteers are carefully managed by paid staff. This professionalisation of politics will only go to marginalise the youth voters; they don’t want to be talked down to, they want to participate and help change the system. If Milliband is serious about taking the youth vote at the next election perhaps he might cut back on his team of experts and spend some money on programmes to get people interested in the Labour party. It may just swing the election for him.

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Money and the Milliband

Miliband is taking a big risk. Will it pay off? ©BobPetUK

What would you do for a salary of 66k? For most young people it’s a salary they can only dream about. Six jobs promising this salary have just been advertised on the Labour party website.

The six posts are for executive directors covering every facet of the party, an attempt at a complete revolution in the way the party is being run. This attempt to fundamentally change the party structure seems to have slipped under the media radar for the moment, we must ask ourselves what has prompted this 396k hiring spree?

Hiring a whole new senior team could be indications of two things, panic, or confidence within the Labour leadership.

Labour has many reasons which could cause it to panic at this time, its poll numbers have remained stagnant during a period of economic instability, a time where an opposition party should be capitalising on the government’s perceived failures and inspiring voters that Labour are a viable alternative to the current government. This restructuring could be seen as an act of a leadership worried that unless it does something radical it may start facing challenges from within its own ranks.

Labour also has reasons to be confident, especially if they can remember their history. After a long period of governance a party typically has problems adjusting to being out of power. After the 1997 elections the Conservative party was in chaos following its defeat and it took many years to reorganise itself to an effective election fighting force. Labour as a party is far more united than the Conservatives were post 1997, the party may be gambling that it may be able to do in one term what its Conservative opponents managed to do in three.

Many paragraphs will be written analysing the Milliband leadership, I’m not going to add to them, I will however ask this, in a time of economic uncertainty can the party justify spending this amount of money of six directors, while attacking the other parties for being on the side of the top tier of society?

It states something very apt on the back of a Labour membership card which the Labour HQ might want to take a look at:

‘By the strength of our common endeavour we achieve more than we achieve alone’

The political parties have all become slick professional operations, where the membership and volunteers are carefully managed by paid staff. This professionalisation of politics will only go to marginalise the youth voters; they don’t want to be talked down to, they want to participate and help change the system.

If Milliband is serious about taking the youth vote at the next election perhaps he might cut back on his team of experts and spend some money on programmes to get people interested in the Labour party. It may just swing the election for him.

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  • Jack Storry

    Okay my problems are:

    – It's not £396k of new investment. Alicia Kennedy and Chris Lennie are leaving + Bob Roberts (Ed's current "Director of News") is likely to take the communications role. This means its only about £196k of new investment as the rest is currently going on salaries for Kennedy, Lennie and Roberts anyway.

    – Its not a sign of either confidence or panic. Iain McNicol is the new GenSec, he held an organisational review and the creation of six directors was a recommendation of that review. One of the roles being "Governance & Services" is a give away that the review is more organisational than political.

    -If Labour doesn't have professional operations it can't win a national campaign. Philip Gould's book The Unfinished Revolution is great at explaining how crucial rebuttal, field organisation etc. is in winning a national campaign.

    -£66k is a fair amount of money. However, considering these are the highest paid staff positions at the Labour Party and that these are the people who will have to have their phones on 24/7 and expected to drop everything if something comes up then I think its a fair salary.

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