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Published on March 21st, 2012 | by The Editor
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[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="565" caption="by The National Archives"][/caption] Today being the day of the budget release, and we being a charity involved in engaging young people, I thought today was an appropriate day to write about an event I attended last Wednesday. This was the launch of the Youth Budget and presentation of the ‘Chance to be Chancellor’ winner, run by the Citizenship Foundation and sponsored by Aviva. The survey and competition were online based, and had 1,175 participants aged 14-18. The survey of opinions covered ten areas of policy, offering 4 real policy ideas as responses.  As well as this, participants were offered the chance to submit their own policies and to justify them. On arrival at the launch I noticed  all the different school uniforms and thought how wonderful it was to see so many young people engaging in the project. There was a panel session chaired by Sam Fleming from The Times, during which some insightful questions were asked, and a myriad of answers given by the panel. The launch was accompanied by the Youth Budget Report 2012, based on responses given in the survey and competition, which I found a most interesting read. The main reason for my interest was to see how young, mainly non-taxpayers feel about taxation and benefit provision, as well as issues they are yet to experience such as the elderly heating allowance.  I was pleasantly surprised at the results; especially the policies of the winner Isaac Warburton, who said “My policies may not be popular with everyone, but they are fair”( Youth budget Report 2012) . There seemed to be recognition by most participants that the deficit is looming, with 69% wanting to spend less and 65% wanting to tax more to cut the deficit.  As the report highlights, this is a very different attitude from last year’s youth budget, where participants supported spending more in government. There was no surprise in the support for spending in some areas, education for instance, but there was a split when it came to how the money should be spent. 36% said investment should go to the introduction of free schools, with 27% believing the cash should be used to rebuild existing schools. It was a great morning at HM treasury; and the winner presented the youth budget at number 11 . The only shame is that few national papers covered the event. The budget will affect those who are not of voting age, and their opinions should be heard. The Citizenship Foundation should be proud of introducing the Youth Budget initiative; it is not only an interesting survey but also a useful learning tool. For more information go to the website here; you won't regret it! We will be live tweeting throughout the budget so take a look @catch21p

1

Youth Budget 2012

by The National Archives

Today being the day of the budget release, and we being a charity involved in engaging young people, I thought today was an appropriate day to write about an event I attended last Wednesday. This was the launch of the Youth Budget and presentation of the ‘Chance to be Chancellor’ winner, run by the Citizenship Foundation and sponsored by Aviva. The survey and competition were online based, and had 1,175 participants aged 14-18. The survey of opinions covered ten areas of policy, offering 4 real policy ideas as responses.  As well as this, participants were offered the chance to submit their own policies and to justify them. On arrival at the launch I noticed  all the different school uniforms and thought how wonderful it was to see so many young people engaging in the project. There was a panel session chaired by Sam Fleming from The Times, during which some insightful questions were asked, and a myriad of answers given by the panel.

The launch was accompanied by the Youth Budget Report 2012, based on responses given in the survey and competition, which I found a most interesting read. The main reason for my interest was to see how young, mainly non-taxpayers feel about taxation and benefit provision, as well as issues they are yet to experience such as the elderly heating allowance.  I was pleasantly surprised at the results; especially the policies of the winner Isaac Warburton, who said “My policies may not be popular with everyone, but they are fair”( Youth budget Report 2012) . There seemed to be recognition by most participants that the deficit is looming, with 69% wanting to spend less and 65% wanting to tax more to cut the deficit.  As the report highlights, this is a very different attitude from last year’s youth budget, where participants supported spending more in government.

There was no surprise in the support for spending in some areas, education for instance, but there was a split when it came to how the money should be spent. 36% said investment should go to the introduction of free schools, with 27% believing the cash should be used to rebuild existing schools.

It was a great morning at HM treasury; and the winner presented the youth budget at number 11 . The only shame is that few national papers covered the event. The budget will affect those who are not of voting age, and their opinions should be heard. The Citizenship Foundation should be proud of introducing the Youth Budget initiative; it is not only an interesting survey but also a useful learning tool. For more information go to the website here; you won’t regret it!

We will be live tweeting throughout the budget so take a look @catch21p

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