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Published on May 28th, 2012 | by Nick Doyle
Image © [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="567" caption="© Mr Ush"][/caption]   What with the "Euro crisis" and it's stranglehold over the news at the moment one would be forgiven for thinking that all the European Union is doing at the moment is focusing on it economic woes; however for a great swathe of the organisation it is business as usual.  Take Stefan Fuele the EU enlargement commissioner for example.  With the precarious nature of the union as it is, it's hard to imagine who would want to join the European club at this time. For one nation however, this has been a long term struggle and one that is unlikely to be scuppered by a crisis of currency.  Turkey has been an associate member of the EU (and its previous incarnations) since 1963 and submitted a formal application to join the EU in 1987, a mere 25 years ago.  Yet where others have acceded Turkey has been held back, in part, because it has yet to meet the various requirements to become a member.  However, as many have been quick to point out, where other countries discrepancies with the rules have been overlooked, Turkey's have not. The relationship between the EU and Turkey has been strained and therefore has created and undoubted sense of bitterness surrounding the issue in the past with politicians and citizens alike.  However the political stalemate may yet have a happy ending with the recent elections in France.  One of the most disputed areas of Turkey's accession is its refusal to allow Cypriot ships to dock in its ports (as it questions the status of the divided island) and previously this led to a French veto on further progress of Turkey's application; some believe this signified Sarkozy's reservations about Turkey rather than political consideration.  Although Hollande's exact views in this area are unknown there is optimism surrounding the future of the prospective member state.  At a time of political unsteadiness with those quick to dismiss the EU as a failed experiment now proving its fundamental shortcomings, what better time to publicise the eagerness of some to still join and the possibility of bringing into the fold a nation unlike any other member state in numerous ways.  To assess Turkey's political, social and military developments in order to join the EU would surely show the power it still has in promoting democracy and civil rights around the world and doesn't that prove the experiment is working after all?

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Turkey: The potential to unite the EU

© Mr Ush

 

What with the “Euro crisis” and it’s stranglehold over the news at the moment one would be forgiven for thinking that all the European Union is doing at the moment is focusing on it economic woes; however for a great swathe of the organisation it is business as usual.  Take Stefan Fuele the EU enlargement commissioner for example.  With the precarious nature of the union as it is, it’s hard to imagine who would want to join the European club at this time. For one nation however, this has been a long term struggle and one that is unlikely to be scuppered by a crisis of currency.  Turkey has been an associate member of the EU (and its previous incarnations) since 1963 and submitted a formal application to join the EU in 1987, a mere 25 years ago.  Yet where others have acceded Turkey has been held back, in part, because it has yet to meet the various requirements to become a member.  However, as many have been quick to point out, where other countries discrepancies with the rules have been overlooked, Turkey’s have not.

The relationship between the EU and Turkey has been strained and therefore has created and undoubted sense of bitterness surrounding the issue in the past with politicians and citizens alike.  However the political stalemate may yet have a happy ending with the recent elections in France.  One of the most disputed areas of Turkey’s accession is its refusal to allow Cypriot ships to dock in its ports (as it questions the status of the divided island) and previously this led to a French veto on further progress of Turkey’s application; some believe this signified Sarkozy’s reservations about Turkey rather than political consideration.  Although Hollande’s exact views in this area are unknown there is optimism surrounding the future of the prospective member state.  At a time of political unsteadiness with those quick to dismiss the EU as a failed experiment now proving its fundamental shortcomings, what better time to publicise the eagerness of some to still join and the possibility of bringing into the fold a nation unlike any other member state in numerous ways.  To assess Turkey’s political, social and military developments in order to join the EU would surely show the power it still has in promoting democracy and civil rights around the world and doesn’t that prove the experiment is working after all?

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  • The reason Turkeys accession to the EU is constantly delayed is for the fact that Europeans (especially Germans) are not keen on being overrun by a potential 80 million muslims.

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