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Politics no image

Published on June 22nd, 2012 | by Ben Sayah
Image © [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] ©RHaworth Lunar House, headquarters of the UK Immigration Office[/caption]

Immigration policy has since the Second World War remained a heated topic. Along with personal perceptions on the matter, previous governments have continuously had to juggle domestic, european, and greater international pressures in making any attempt to tackle problems which have mounted from our globalised world. For many, migrants pose great dilemmas for the future of Britain’s internal security; workforce; living/welfare standards; and the standard of our commons.

Yet - especially in a time of recession - there are also incredible benefits to having a comprehensive, but open, immigration policy. Economic expansion through cheap labour force; increase in social and market options in a culturally diverse society; a younger, more skilled and able workforce; and an influx of skilled workers in deprived regions and industries. But even when these advantages outweigh simple disadvantages domestic social calls have remained largely averse towards any open policy of immigration.

Overall one fact remains certain. Conservative governments consistently stand better trusted in handling matters of immigration. Throughout numerous premierships conservative governments stance against europe and towards migrant regulation have placed them as the leading party in tackling domestic issues with immigration. More recently, Cameron’s stance on imposing a government cap on immigration - although since reversed - crowned them as victors in the 2010 general election. However migrant concerns has once again emerged into the government agenda, and this time new opposition Labour leader, Ed Miliband, will attempt to dominate the debate on immigration.

Whilst the conservatives have dominated the protectionist agenda, the Labour party have previously remained supporters of a more multicultural, inclusive outlook. Although this has in the past caused them problems with other politicians and the public - particularly during the Gillian Duffy affair - Labour have continued to advocate an open stance towards immigration. Nonetheless the Duffy ‘Biggotsgate’ affair did expose certain prevalent public problems towards Labour policy, as future moderate and cogent questioning of immigration policy is integral to the development of a nation beholding proficient citizens. Clearly we should be able to discuss and resolve the positive and negative points of immigration without worrying about being brandished. This has been Labours problem previously, and it is only once this is settled that they will be trusted with the task of dealing with the immigration.

Evidently the polarisation of party politics is doing little to aid the current debate. So moving away from party politics, what convincing immigration plans can be initiated which will embolden our domestic population of migrant benefits, whilst encouraging an adept international workforce? Recent cross governmental research suggests that currently leaders of all parties should begin to propose policy measures - specifically domestic measures - which may begin to solve domestic and international concerns on UK immigration. By far the most beneficial policy change would include increasing the national minimum wage.

As matters stand the UK Minimum wage for a worker over the age of 21 is £6.08. Research shows that increasing this figure would encourage unemployed British workers to pursue certain careers, they had not previously wanted to handle. Although we should not be forcing a reluctant workforce into jobs, government should be making changes which adapt repugnant jobs, allowing these positions to become more convincing to the rising unemployed. This would not only deal with the problems of domestic unemployment, but also increase social living standards within the UK, by taking people off unemployed benefits and placing them into attractively paid jobs. Migrants need to stop being perceived as the problem, individuals who have travelled from abroad and began working in the UK have only done so because they - unlike our domestic unemployed - are not reluctant to be paid a cheap wage. Increasing the minimum wage would eventually attract the unemployed out of their houses and onto the payroll.

Overall the largest problem facing immigration and unemployment are stubborn employers. An attractive combined workforce of ambitious migrants and athirst citizens undoubtedly contributes to the healthy society that both political parties desire. Although it seems that until the party politics begins to be taken out of immigration decisions, we will still not only suffer the effects of ridiculously monitored and restrained immigration, but also ones dealt by growing unemployment, social and racial separation, and another long recession.

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Immigration Policy: Out with Party Politics

©RHaworth Lunar House, headquarters of the UK Immigration Office

Immigration policy has since the Second World War remained a heated topic. Along with personal perceptions on the matter, previous governments have continuously had to juggle domestic, european, and greater international pressures in making any attempt to tackle problems which have mounted from our globalised world. For many, migrants pose great dilemmas for the future of Britain’s internal security; workforce; living/welfare standards; and the standard of our commons.

Yet – especially in a time of recession – there are also incredible benefits to having a comprehensive, but open, immigration policy. Economic expansion through cheap labour force; increase in social and market options in a culturally diverse society; a younger, more skilled and able workforce; and an influx of skilled workers in deprived regions and industries. But even when these advantages outweigh simple disadvantages domestic social calls have remained largely averse towards any open policy of immigration.

Overall one fact remains certain. Conservative governments consistently stand better trusted in handling matters of immigration. Throughout numerous premierships conservative governments stance against europe and towards migrant regulation have placed them as the leading party in tackling domestic issues with immigration. More recently, Cameron’s stance on imposing a government cap on immigration – although since reversed – crowned them as victors in the 2010 general election. However migrant concerns has once again emerged into the government agenda, and this time new opposition Labour leader, Ed Miliband, will attempt to dominate the debate on immigration.

Whilst the conservatives have dominated the protectionist agenda, the Labour party have previously remained supporters of a more multicultural, inclusive outlook. Although this has in the past caused them problems with other politicians and the public – particularly during the Gillian Duffy affair – Labour have continued to advocate an open stance towards immigration. Nonetheless the Duffy ‘Biggotsgate’ affair did expose certain prevalent public problems towards Labour policy, as future moderate and cogent questioning of immigration policy is integral to the development of a nation beholding proficient citizens. Clearly we should be able to discuss and resolve the positive and negative points of immigration without worrying about being brandished. This has been Labours problem previously, and it is only once this is settled that they will be trusted with the task of dealing with the immigration.

Evidently the polarisation of party politics is doing little to aid the current debate. So moving away from party politics, what convincing immigration plans can be initiated which will embolden our domestic population of migrant benefits, whilst encouraging an adept international workforce? Recent cross governmental research suggests that currently leaders of all parties should begin to propose policy measures – specifically domestic measures – which may begin to solve domestic and international concerns on UK immigration. By far the most beneficial policy change would include increasing the national minimum wage.

As matters stand the UK Minimum wage for a worker over the age of 21 is £6.08. Research shows that increasing this figure would encourage unemployed British workers to pursue certain careers, they had not previously wanted to handle. Although we should not be forcing a reluctant workforce into jobs, government should be making changes which adapt repugnant jobs, allowing these positions to become more convincing to the rising unemployed. This would not only deal with the problems of domestic unemployment, but also increase social living standards within the UK, by taking people off unemployed benefits and placing them into attractively paid jobs. Migrants need to stop being perceived as the problem, individuals who have travelled from abroad and began working in the UK have only done so because they – unlike our domestic unemployed – are not reluctant to be paid a cheap wage. Increasing the minimum wage would eventually attract the unemployed out of their houses and onto the payroll.

Overall the largest problem facing immigration and unemployment are stubborn employers. An attractive combined workforce of ambitious migrants and athirst citizens undoubtedly contributes to the healthy society that both political parties desire. Although it seems that until the party politics begins to be taken out of immigration decisions, we will still not only suffer the effects of ridiculously monitored and restrained immigration, but also ones dealt by growing unemployment, social and racial separation, and another long recession.

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