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Politics no image

Published on July 23rd, 2012 | by Ben Sayah
Image © [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] ©Scorpions and Centaurs[/caption]   Government is out for Summer. As we enter the stagnant stage of the summer recess, we also enter the mid-point of this coalition government’s term, a point famed for either making or breaking government legacy. So as we reach this fateful point it seems necessary to apiece a conclusive list of questions the coalition will inevitably face when they return. Already have concerns arisen, questioning the future integrity of the government, so hopefully this list will serve as an analysis foreseeing the hurdles, either leading to a coalition ‘doomed to succeed’ or simply doomed. Out for summer, or out forever?

Competence. Simply put, is the government proficient enough to survive? For all those following u-turn after u-turn, direction for this leadership is surely lost. Lost even for those who perceive themselves to be in the government; due to the governments competence - or lack of - top ministers and MPs have even failed to follow, and trust the guidance of this government's policy because its policy is forever changing. Take Chloe Smith MP for example. Her recent newsnight debacle hit the press as she was railed for not being able to follow the coalitions change of feeling towards the fuel tax duty. The coalitions incompetence in following their own policy has understandably led to hostility from the public and some MPs. If the coalition is to survive its term, this question of competence must be addressed so all followers of the government know the direction this government hopes to take. So coalition, “Do you ever think you’re incompetent”?

Although this was to be largely expected, the opposition is doing far better. Ed Miliband has gone further, faster in acknowledging, and combating the problems the public have with society, finance and the government today; his and Labour’s popularity has soared. Although the coalition has continually attempted to latch on to Ed’s appeal by regurgitating his calls for helping the ‘squeezed middle’ and adopting a more ‘responsible capitalism’, results are slowly becoming fruitless. Although it is by no means certain, Ed’s purpose in politics is more detailed than Cameron and Clegg’s. “He believes that social mobility is harder in an unequal country where ‘the rungs are too far apart’, but he also knows that the popular idea of fairness demands responsibilities as well as rights.” This clear purpose is what is keeping the Labour party appeal afloat; this seems a quality the coalition government seems to be lacking.

The Governments message must also be made clearer if it hopes to survive another half term. Camerons trademark catchphrase ‘We’re all in this together’ seems - like the coalition - to have lost its charm. The overwhelming factor which seems to have done this, more significantly than others is Osborne’s Budget wreck. The attempt for the coalition to prise the banner of social unity, whilst seemingly forcing tax increases for the poorer, and tax cuts for the wealthy simply didn’t dye; if anything the financial separation between those in government, and those on the street mounted and were made national poignant. Although ‘Camborne’ attempted to revitalise the message - by suggesting that they too can be ‘simple pasty noshing normal guys’ - the public rejected this display and the gap of social segregation between wealthy leaders and the poorer public increased. In order to survive, the coalition must set out a new message, one that unites the public and the politicians together; however this must also be backed by effective policy. Without this message the purpose of the coalition will be only continue to increase the gap and the number of those becoming disillusioned with politics.

Overall to survive the next half term the coalition must realign itself with the public. Although this is a quality many believe the current government now lack, Cameron should by no means be underestimated. When in opposition Cameron’s best quality was aligning himself with the distresses of the public, although this ability has not recently revealed itself, it should not be forgotten. With the London Olympics looming around the corner, the coalition will still have every opportunity to stabilise itself and take advantage these concerns in an nationally enthused environment. However this mood will not prove enough and if these affairs - amongst some others -  are ignored the coalition lifeline will inevitably fall to public scrutiny once more, but next time it may not survive.

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Half Term for Coalition

©Scorpions and Centaurs

 

Government is out for Summer. As we enter the stagnant stage of the summer recess, we also enter the mid-point of this coalition government’s term, a point famed for either making or breaking government legacy. So as we reach this fateful point it seems necessary to apiece a conclusive list of questions the coalition will inevitably face when they return. Already have concerns arisen, questioning the future integrity of the government, so hopefully this list will serve as an analysis foreseeing the hurdles, either leading to a coalition ‘doomed to succeed’ or simply doomed. Out for summer, or out forever?

Competence. Simply put, is the government proficient enough to survive? For all those following u-turn after u-turn, direction for this leadership is surely lost. Lost even for those who perceive themselves to be in the government; due to the governments competence – or lack of – top ministers and MPs have even failed to follow, and trust the guidance of this government’s policy because its policy is forever changing. Take Chloe Smith MP for example. Her recent newsnight debacle hit the press as she was railed for not being able to follow the coalitions change of feeling towards the fuel tax duty. The coalitions incompetence in following their own policy has understandably led to hostility from the public and some MPs. If the coalition is to survive its term, this question of competence must be addressed so all followers of the government know the direction this government hopes to take. So coalition, “Do you ever think you’re incompetent”?

Although this was to be largely expected, the opposition is doing far better. Ed Miliband has gone further, faster in acknowledging, and combating the problems the public have with society, finance and the government today; his and Labour’s popularity has soared. Although the coalition has continually attempted to latch on to Ed’s appeal by regurgitating his calls for helping the ‘squeezed middle’ and adopting a more ‘responsible capitalism’, results are slowly becoming fruitless. Although it is by no means certain, Ed’s purpose in politics is more detailed than Cameron and Clegg’s. “He believes that social mobility is harder in an unequal country where ‘the rungs are too far apart’, but he also knows that the popular idea of fairness demands responsibilities as well as rights.” This clear purpose is what is keeping the Labour party appeal afloat; this seems a quality the coalition government seems to be lacking.

The Governments message must also be made clearer if it hopes to survive another half term. Camerons trademark catchphrase ‘We’re all in this together’ seems – like the coalition – to have lost its charm. The overwhelming factor which seems to have done this, more significantly than others is Osborne’s Budget wreck. The attempt for the coalition to prise the banner of social unity, whilst seemingly forcing tax increases for the poorer, and tax cuts for the wealthy simply didn’t dye; if anything the financial separation between those in government, and those on the street mounted and were made national poignant. Although ‘Camborne’ attempted to revitalise the message – by suggesting that they too can be ‘simple pasty noshing normal guys’ – the public rejected this display and the gap of social segregation between wealthy leaders and the poorer public increased. In order to survive, the coalition must set out a new message, one that unites the public and the politicians together; however this must also be backed by effective policy. Without this message the purpose of the coalition will be only continue to increase the gap and the number of those becoming disillusioned with politics.

Overall to survive the next half term the coalition must realign itself with the public. Although this is a quality many believe the current government now lack, Cameron should by no means be underestimated. When in opposition Cameron’s best quality was aligning himself with the distresses of the public, although this ability has not recently revealed itself, it should not be forgotten. With the London Olympics looming around the corner, the coalition will still have every opportunity to stabilise itself and take advantage these concerns in an nationally enthused environment. However this mood will not prove enough and if these affairs – amongst some others –  are ignored the coalition lifeline will inevitably fall to public scrutiny once more, but next time it may not survive.

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