Catch21 - Our Charity ArmCatch21 is a charitable production company set up in 2005 which trains young people to make videos and engage with their communities.Catch Creative - Our Video Production ArmCatch Creative offers a complete video production service, from Conception to Distribution.Catch EngagementCatch Engagement is the new video interaction platform from Catch21 which allows you to run a campaign using both user generated films as well as professionally shot ones which are displayed via Video 'Walls'. Catch Engagement is all about using films to build an online community - welcome to the future of video.

We shoot cutting edge videos and provide a forum to give people a voice.
Engagement. Discussion. Empowerment.


All content featured on our charity site is produced by young volunteers with the support and mentoring of our professional production team.

Politics no image

Published on November 13th, 2012 | by Katie Wetherall
Image © [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] © Paul Robert Lloyd ; BBC Television Centre[/caption]   The last month has possibly been the worst in the BBC’s 85 year history. Since an ITV Documentary Exposure: The Other Side of Jimmy Saville  revealed the late BBC presenter and Radio 1 DJ to be a predatory sex offender, the media whirlwind has simply not stopped. As fresh allegations began from more than 200 witnesses, a criminal investigation was launched by the Metropolitan Police Service into child abuse of mainly underage girls that happened in homes, hospitals and BBC studios.  The BBC crumbled over its child protection policy and over allegations of a cover up, as newspapers reported that multiple members of senior management during the ‘70’s and 80’s knew of the assertions. The knowledge that Newsnight had dropped an investigation into Saville to be broadcast in December 2011, two months after his death, has caused further disrepute to the BBC. Further to the Saville crisis, the BBC faced fresh heat as a Newsnight film alleged child abuse at a care home in Wrexham, North Wales during the 70’s and 80’s by an unnamed Conservative politician - which was proved to be unfounded, generating ‘trial by Newsnight’.  Whilst the programme did not name the politician, twitter did – witch-hunting Lord McAlpine, a senior Tory during the Thatcher era. Lord McAlpine described the false allegations as ‘heart-breaking’, ‘wholly false and seriously defamatory,’  The BBC began to cave to pressure and scrutiny as the October 9th Newsnight hastily broadcast a statement of apology to Lord McAlpine, whilst even questioning its own future, with lead presenter Eddie Mair asking Conservative MP Rob Wilson: ‘Is Newsnight toast?’ What is left of the BBC?  The 10th November resignation of the BBC’S Director in General  George Entwistle, who described his decision as the ‘honourable thing to do’ has begun a systematic removal of many of the top BBC executives, with Helen Boaden, head of BBC News and her deputy Stephen Mitchell suspended pending review.  Steve Hewlett, Radio 4 presenter, claimed on Newsnight ‘journalism isn’t working.’ There is no denial the BBC and the Bureaux of Investigative Journalism faces very serious questions, not only concerning the culture and ethics of the BBC, but on the validity and trust of its journalistic practises.   In 2009 a ComRes survey revealed 65% of people trusted the BBC – in the last couple of days, this has fallen to only 45%. Nearly two-thirds of the British adults questioned said they believed the Corporation would suffer “lasting damage to its reputation”. This could prove devastating in a body that relies on trust for their legitimacy and is funded by the public. But if there is one thing that the ongoing Newsnight scandal has taught us, it is that we must not be too quick to point the finger of blame. The tragedies of child abuse are not isolated: Scandals are being uncovered in the NHS, Crown Prosecution Service, social services and multiple police trusts. We must not implement a knee-jerk reaction to what has happened at the Beeb. Perhaps the recent resignation will help politicians eager to appease public opinion, but in the long term the BBC must be given time to conduct a fully extensive review of what happened – without producing programmes presenting half-baked apologies.  We must remember the BBC’s successes through their collaboration with the Bureaux of Investigative Journalism – and allow this memory to propel the Beeb through what is sure to be a sticky few months.  Examples include Panorama’ expose of the Winterbourne View hospital abuse and Euro 2012: Stadiums of Hate which uncovered racism and anti-Semitism in Football. Of the 3 inquiries into the BBC – which could increase over the next week – none will be able to fully offer a united and detailed solution to the problems the Beeb faces. The issue of child abuse and the tragedy that so many people faced is not an insular problem. One in six children aged 11-17 (16.5%) have experienced some level of sexual abuse, demonstrating that there is an underlying problem with society and the way abuse and the victims of abuse are recognised. The BBC has its share of issues- which has been recognised and is now being dealt with. The 2011 phone hacking scandal has shown us that it will be the decade of 2010-2020 that could mark the downfall of the British media. However the Beeb should not become a victim in itself, with time it will recover, as it did from the 2003 Hutton Inquiry. We live in an ever increasing complex world of 24 hour news and cyberspace democracy which has blurred the lines of journalism and ethics. Nevertheless every morning some 23,000 employees of the BBC will go to work. For the biggest broadcaster in the world, the show must go on.

0

Don’t throw the Beeb out with the bath water

© Paul Robert Lloyd ; BBC Television Centre

 

The last month has possibly been the worst in the BBC’s 85 year history. Since an ITV Documentary Exposure: The Other Side of Jimmy Saville  revealed the late BBC presenter and Radio 1 DJ to be a predatory sex offender, the media whirlwind has simply not stopped. As fresh allegations began from more than 200 witnesses, a criminal investigation was launched by the Metropolitan Police Service into child abuse of mainly underage girls that happened in homes, hospitals and BBC studios.  The BBC crumbled over its child protection policy and over allegations of a cover up, as newspapers reported that multiple members of senior management during the ‘70’s and 80’s knew of the assertions. The knowledge that Newsnight had dropped an investigation into Saville to be broadcast in December 2011, two months after his death, has caused further disrepute to the BBC.

Further to the Saville crisis, the BBC faced fresh heat as a Newsnight film alleged child abuse at a care home in Wrexham, North Wales during the 70’s and 80’s by an unnamed Conservative politician – which was proved to be unfounded, generating ‘trial by Newsnight’.  Whilst the programme did not name the politician, twitter did – witch-hunting Lord McAlpine, a senior Tory during the Thatcher era. Lord McAlpine described the false allegations as ‘heart-breaking’, ‘wholly false and seriously defamatory,’  The BBC began to cave to pressure and scrutiny as the October 9th Newsnight hastily broadcast a statement of apology to Lord McAlpine, whilst even questioning its own future, with lead presenter Eddie Mair asking Conservative MP Rob Wilson: ‘Is Newsnight toast?

What is left of the BBC?  The 10th November resignation of the BBC’S Director in General  George Entwistle, who described his decision as the ‘honourable thing to do’ has begun a systematic removal of many of the top BBC executives, with Helen Boaden, head of BBC News and her deputy Stephen Mitchell suspended pending review.  Steve Hewlett, Radio 4 presenter, claimed on Newsnight ‘journalism isn’t working.’ There is no denial the BBC and the Bureaux of Investigative Journalism faces very serious questions, not only concerning the culture and ethics of the BBC, but on the validity and trust of its journalistic practises.   In 2009 a ComRes survey revealed 65% of people trusted the BBC – in the last couple of days, this has fallen to only 45%. Nearly two-thirds of the British adults questioned said they believed the Corporation would suffer “lasting damage to its reputation”.

This could prove devastating in a body that relies on trust for their legitimacy and is funded by the public. But if there is one thing that the ongoing Newsnight scandal has taught us, it is that we must not be too quick to point the finger of blame. The tragedies of child abuse are not isolated: Scandals are being uncovered in the NHS, Crown Prosecution Service, social services and multiple police trusts.

We must not implement a knee-jerk reaction to what has happened at the Beeb. Perhaps the recent resignation will help politicians eager to appease public opinion, but in the long term the BBC must be given time to conduct a fully extensive review of what happened – without producing programmes presenting half-baked apologies.  We must remember the BBC’s successes through their collaboration with the Bureaux of Investigative Journalism – and allow this memory to propel the Beeb through what is sure to be a sticky few months.  Examples include Panorama’ expose of the Winterbourne View hospital abuse and Euro 2012: Stadiums of Hate which uncovered racism and anti-Semitism in Football.

Of the 3 inquiries into the BBC – which could increase over the next week – none will be able to fully offer a united and detailed solution to the problems the Beeb faces. The issue of child abuse and the tragedy that so many people faced is not an insular problem. One in six children aged 11-17 (16.5%) have experienced some level of sexual abuse, demonstrating that there is an underlying problem with society and the way abuse and the victims of abuse are recognised. The BBC has its share of issues- which has been recognised and is now being dealt with.

The 2011 phone hacking scandal has shown us that it will be the decade of 2010-2020 that could mark the downfall of the British media. However the Beeb should not become a victim in itself, with time it will recover, as it did from the 2003 Hutton Inquiry. We live in an ever increasing complex world of 24 hour news and cyberspace democracy which has blurred the lines of journalism and ethics. Nevertheless every morning some 23,000 employees of the BBC will go to work. For the biggest broadcaster in the world, the show must go on.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

Katie Wetherall

Katie Wetherall, 17, is studying A-Level Politics. She is especially interested in the renewal of democracy in UK and Europe. She writes on issues concerning civil liberties, human rights and the influence of the media on politics. Katie is a strong believer that political participation is the key to democracy and is an ongoing theme within her blogs. She is currently working towards promoting politics to young people through journalism and her local community. Katie is hoping to pursue a degree in Politics and International Relations and continue to write on current affairs.



Back to Top ↑